JMS Chip & Performance has just released their JMS Dominator SN197 rear brake kit. This kit includes coated/drilled rotors, caliper relocation brackets, ABS brackets, and all of the mounting hardware. This kit will fit on ’05 and up Mustang GT and GT500s.

Official Release

JMS CHIP & PERFORMANCE Dominator SN197 Rear Brake Kit

This brake kit allows the use of 15 inch rear wheels on any S197 Mustang GT or GT500.

SN197 owners can now take advantage of the various drag radial and slick sizes available for 15 inch wheels. You can now run a tire with enough sidewall to get even the highest horsepower S197’s down the street or track.

This kit contains: coated/drilled rotors, caliper relocation brackets, abs brackets, mounting hardware and detailed instructions.

Retail Price is $219.00. Dealer inquires welcome. For more information go to www.jmschip.com or call JMS Chip & Performance at 601-766-9424.

• Coated/drilled rotors
• Allows the use of 15 inch rear wheels
• Retail price of $219.00

Contact Information

JMS Chip & Performance
Web: www.jmschip.com
Phone: 601-766-9424

COMP Cams’ new Ultra Pro Magnum Rocker Arms are engineering works of art. Just one look at the redesigned version of the very popular Pro Magnum line of rocker arms shows the ingenious thought process behind the rocker arm’s design. We wanted to go to school on these rocker arms and see what kind of report card they earn.

Watch the Video on COMP Cams New Ultra Pro Magnum Rocker Arms:

Art Appreciation Class

Seeing is believing. At least that’s what my art appreciation professor told my college class as we were required to look at a Picasso and describe what we saw. As I recall, most of my classmates saw something akin to a kindergarten finger painting as we gazed at that piece of art. Now, looking at Comp Cams new Ultra Pro Magnum Rocker Arms, I finally understand what true art appreciation means. Yes, seeing IS believing! Not only are these new rocker arms true works of art, but anyone can plainly see the advantage of their stellar design. Even stronger and lighter in weight than COMP’s own best selling Pro Magnum Rocker Arms, this Ultra design earns an A+ in humanities.


Reduced mass for increased retainer and spring clearances.

History Class

Once upon a time there were only two choices in rocker arms; stainless steel, which tended to be used for applications where strength and reliability were needed, and aluminum, for lightweight and lower cost applications. Almost twenty years ago, COMP Cams released the uber popular Pro Magnum Rocker Arms which combined strength and reliability with lightweight low cost rocker arms made from 8650 chromemoly steel. Continuing computer advancements and superior design technology have led COMP Cams to restructure the already successful Pro Magnum rocker arms with a web-like structure adding even more strength and reducing even more mass. Dubbed the Ultra Pro Magnum Rocker Arms, COMP Cams has made another historic improvement in rocker arm design. We talked with Chris Mays at COMP Cams about taking a very successful rocker arm and redesigning it. “There’s always the opportunity to make something better,” Mays commented. “As technology changes and information changes, the opportunity to make parts stronger, more user friendly, and apply across a wider variety of applications presents itself.” Another set of high marks for the academic scorecard.

Physics Class

Through restructuring at the most basic liquid molten level, COMP Cams uses an advanced web-like structure to add strength in the rocker arms while allowing the engineers to reduce mass in low stress areas of the components. This results in maximum lift and valve train control at high RPM. Reducing mass also increases retainer and spring clearances allowing larger valve springs, retainers, and locks without fitment issues. Mays also told us that the new rocker arms “have truer ratios and the valve spring clearances reduce many issues with big block engines. Valve spring clearance with higher lift cams are always an issue in big block engines whether it’s Chevy, Ford, or Mopar.” Making the rocker arms “more user friendly” and capping it all off with a black oxide finish that inherently sheds oil for a more efficient valve train with even less mass earn high grades in this class. Ultra Pro Magnum Rocker Arms = A+ squared.


A good looking piece that is refined with technical advances.

Statistics and Analysis Class

  • Manufactured from 8650 chromemoly steel
  • 300% stronger than extruded 7075-T6 aluminum
  • Weighs 5% less at the valve than most aluminum rocker arms
  • Through extensive Spintron and dyno testing, the Ultra Pro Magnum Rocker Arms are proven to be 29% stiffer than the original Pro Magnum Rocker Arms
  • Featuring an over-sized trunion and precision sorted needle bearings for use with high load valve springs
  • Hardened roller tips reduce friction and elimination of premature valve guide wear
  • Available for most popular Chevy and Ford, street and race engine applications


Less weight and deflection from the fulcrum point to the roller tip.

Physical Education Class

The new Ultra Pro Magnum Rocker Arms are made of 8650 chromemoly steel, which is 300% stronger than extruded 7075-T6 aluminum; it is the strongest of aluminum materials. Unlike aluminum rockers, the new Ultra Pro Magnum Rocker Arms offer rigidity for maximum lift, limited flex, and cycle strength that will last a lifetime with the added bonus of reduced deflection from the fulcrum point to the roller tip. As a result, Ultra Pro Magnum Rocker Arms weigh 5% less at the valve than most aluminum rocker arms. Less weight in the valve train means less load on the valve springs which in turn allows the engine to turn more rpm for more top end power. Putting your valve train on a diet without losing strength and reliability earns a 4.0 grade point average.


COMP Cams goes to the head of the class with this rocker arm.

Economics Class

The redesign of the Pro Magnum Rockers allows for a larger trunion with added needle bearings to spread the load more evenly which helps promote a longer lifespan of the component. The Ultra Pro Magnum Rocker Arms are also rebuildable, which means that they can be disassembled for inspection or for replacement of the roller tips, axle, or bearings making the rocker arm like new. Through normal use, these rocker arms will last more than a lifetime. COMP Cams even guarantees the rocker bodies for life against breakage. Buying one set that never has to be replaced is the best economic value going!

Because of the high marks that COMP Cams Ultra Pro Magnum Rocker Arms have earned, we award an advanced degree in higher education with the “Magnum Cum Laude” distinction. It’s true, seeing IS believing! For more information on the Ultra Pro Magnum Rocker Arms or any of the other fine products from COMP Cams, visit their website at www.compcams.com

Source:
COMP Cams Inc.
Web: COMP Cams – Performance Camshafts, Valve Train, & Much More
Phone: 800-999-0853

Interlum’s Mustang Custom Scuff Plate Install

Wednesday, February 10th, 2010
Few can argue that the late model Mustang is one of the most personalized cars in the market today. From body kits, to wheels, to engine upgrades, fans of the Mustang can encounter a variety of aftermarket add-ons when you attend a Mustang car show, flip through the pages of any Mustang niche magazine or spend an hour on the StangTV website.

One new product that takes personalization to a new level is a custom sill (a.k.a. scuff plate) for the late model Mustang. Once looked at as an afterthought when customizing the Mustang interior, new advances in technology can turn the “door step” to your Mustang into a personalized billboard.

The scuff plates are manufactured by Michigan based Interlum and can be custom ordered with any name or motto plus a number of Mustang themed logos. In addition to being cool, the plates are built from OEM quality materials since the company manufactures scuff plates already for Ford, Lincoln and many other OE manufacturers.

We were invited to Interlum’s Plymouth, Michigan custom shop to see how the personalized scuff plates were made and to meet the team that developed the unique product. Mike Judge is the owner of Interlum and has been busy over the past few months launching the product and developing the process to custom order the plates.

A few months ago, www.fordcustomscuffplates.com was launched and the site allows a customer to select what script and logo they want on their personalized sill plate order. If a computer is not accessable, a 1-800 line has been set-up to order, the number to call is 1-800-367-3788. The scuff plates retail for $199.95, not a bad deal considering they are personalized, include LED lighting and made just like the OEM Ford units.


The Interlum technician sets up the nameplate material in Corel Draw, a program used by the laser-engraving machine to etch the material.

Once Interlum receives the order, a technician sets up the nameplate material in Corel Draw, a program used by the laser-engraving machine to burn the top section of the material. For our custom plate, we brought the PowerTV logo eps file and selected the words “Turbo Mel” for the personalized section on the plate. Turbo Mel is a nickname for Melissa Lawrence’s Turbocharged 2010 Mustang daily driver. The Mustang is a current PowerTV project car that features a Hellion Turbo system. To balance out the plate, the layout technician selected a Ford Oval logo to the right of the script and after final sizing we were ready to engrave.


The raw personalized plate material looks similar to brushed steel and the laser etches the top silver layer leaving the clear bottom section untouched.


Interlum uses a laser engraver, a device similar to a laser printer, to create the plate section of the scuff plate.

Once the technician had the layout set, he instructed the Epilog Laser Engraver to start engraving. The laser engraver works similar to a laser printer but uses a beam of ultra-hot light as the engraving tool. The laser burns the top layer of the sheet and no part of the machinery actually touches the material being engraved. Laser engraving produces a permanent, crisp, highly detailed mark, engraving images at up to 1200 dots per inch.

In addition to engraving, the laser can also be instructed to cut the material. Once the Turbo Mel text and logos were engraved, the technician plotted off the final size of the sill plate and instructed to laser to cut out the plate.


Interlum’s owner Mike Judge checks the finished etched plate before final installation of the light pipe and scuff plate.

With the personalized plate section done, Interlum was ready to assemble all the sill plate components made up of the sill plate body, light pipe, wiring harness and personalized plate.

The sill plates feature an LED “light pipe” that runs the entire length of the script section and backlights the script when the interior lights are activated. At night the backlit plate really sets off the interior especially when the door is opened for entrance or exit. Interlum has developed the proprietary LED light pipe technology that casts an even light over the entire length of the plate. Combined with the Mustang’s MyColor interior option the color options are limitless.

Factory Scuff Plate Removal


The factory 2010 Mustang scuff plate features the Mustang logo and looks like every other 2010 Mustang GT rolling around town

The first step was removing the factory installed sill plate. This was accomplished by forcing the sill plate out of the snap points with a trim removal tool and unplugging the lighting connector. Its up to you to decide what you want to do with the old sill plates, the instructions showed a trash can symbol but we tend to hang onto things for craigslist or a future swapmeet.


The factory 2010 Mustang scuff plate was removed with the aid of a trim removal tool and the factory connector was unplugged.

Custom Scuff Plate Installation

The Interlum custom Mustang scuff plates came well packed in a custom box to prevent damage. Easy to follow instructions were included and we followed their step-by-step guide.

We took the new Interlum Custom sill plate out of the shipping box, laid them over the lower door seam and plugged in the OE lighting connector. One the electrical connector was solidly in place we snapped the scuff plate in place and removed the adhesive tape backing.


Prior to installing the scuff plate, we plugged in the new scuff plate electrical connector into the OE plug.


The adhesive tape backing is removed prior to securing the outer edge of the sill plate to the rocker panel.


The new Turbo Mel scuff plates look great and combined with the new logos add a personalized PowerTV touch to the car.

Contact Information:

Interlum/Ford Custom Scuff Plates
1-800-367-3788
www.fordcustomscuffplates.com

The basic design of a carburetor is well over a hundred and twenty five years old, as invented by the founder of Mercedes-Benz in 1885. Although they have long been superseded by EFI in passenger vehicles, carbs are still widely used today in street/strip and racing applications. And they have not stopped evolving, as the most recent addition to the carburetor evolutionary ladder is the all-new aluminum lightweight Holley Ultra series.

Holley’s Jump Into Aluminum Bodies With the Ultra Series

The biggest achievement with the new Ultra line is Holley’s foray into the aluminum body market while previous generations were made from zinc. Zinc itself is a bright silver-like metal, and the problem with untreated zinc is that it reacts with air and water to make a powdery material known as ‘white rust’. The green of the typical Holley carburetor actually comes form a chromic acid solution, which forms a thin layer on the surface of the metal and helps protect the surface.


The Holley 4150-style Ultra Avenger with blue and red accents, with the 4150-style Double Pumper in black.

Holley’s jump over to aluminum bodies was much more involved than you would think. “The characteristics of a zinc body is completely different from an aluminum body,” says Jay McFarland of Holley. “We had to completely redesign the carburetors from the ground up. Nothing really changed, it was just compensating the design for how the aluminum pours and reacts versus how the zinc does.”

The 4500-series Holley Ultra Dominators come in red or black.

New Carburetor Design Receives a New Tune Up

Holley has always done a great job with the out-of-the-box performance on their carburetors. Regardless of application, they will generally get the car running and idling correctly and offer a safe fuel curve under calibration. Generally, one would find themselves dropping jet sizes down a little since the stock calibration is a bit on the safe side. With the Ultra series, these carburetors received 100% fresh-tune set-ups.

“One thing we did with the Ultra Series is that we completely went through and re-calibrated all the fuel curves on them,” commented McFarland. “This allows for better throttle response and drivability. When the double pumpers were first released in the late ’60s, that had a little richer fuel curve to them. Over the years we have learned a lot from them and that allowed us to tune them in a little better.”

Holley re-calibrates their carburetors in three different ways:

  • Flow Bench Testing
  • Engine Dyno Testing
  • Real World Vehicle Testing (with wide band 02 sensors).

This ensures that the tune up will be more aggressive than years past, but not too aggressive to cause problems. You wonder, how much? Holley says around 5-15% leaner, depending on the carburetor.

The Ultra Double Pumper weighs a mere 7 pounds.

Additional Options on the Ultra Series

While the Double Pumper and Avenger carburetors received mainly aesthetic and weight changes, the Dominator’s received some performance enhancements. The main difference between these two street carburetors is that the Avenger operates with vacuum secondaries and the Double Pumper is mechanical. Also, before the Ultra line, the Double Pumper did not have an electric choke, though it now comes with one.

The weight savings on the street carburetors is five pounds while the Dominator drops nearly four. Also, the street versions are offered in blue, red, and black accents while the Dominator only comes in red or black. “Another great thing about the aluminum bodies is that they are very easily polished. You can do a hand polish on them and almost make it look like chrome,” said McFarland.

Billet Metering Blocks and Base Plates

Another cast component that takes the kick to the curb is the base plates and metering blocks. In it’s place, you get fully machined billet components offered in red, blue, or black. Since the Dominator’s have integrated base plates (which are aluminum now), the billet versions are only available for the Avenger and Double Pumper. The billet base plates won’t snap if an over-tightening situation occurs, and they also will never deflect over time and lead to vacuum leaks. The billet metering blocks allow for a true mating surface between the main body and bowls to prevent leaks. Also since the metering blocks are billet and not cast, porosity problems will be a thing of the past.


Glass Fuel Level Sights

Making sure your float bowls have the proper amount of gas in them is important when it comes to ensuring a properly running carburetor. Too much fuel in the bowls will push additional gas into the carburetor and too low will cause the car to stumble as they run dry. If you are trying to reduce the float level while the car is running, this can cause fuel to pour out of the side of the carburetor and onto a hot engine. Temporary plastic sight levels will get smoky if you leave them installed. The glass levels allow you to quickly check the level and adjust it without spilling any fuel.

Further Performance Enhancements on the Dominator

The billet metering blocks in the Dominators offer more fine tuning options. They come with changeable idle feed restrictors to change idle air/fuel ratios, changeable emulsion bleeds to help with fine tuning, and tunable power valve restrictors for smoother fuel transition to the main circuit.

Previous generation Dominators had an internal throttle shaft when it came to changing the rate of opening on the throttle blades. These were time consuming to adjust and contained moving parts that racers feared could come apart and fall down into the intake manifold. They have been simplified by a new external linkage design that allows for a 1 to 1 or progressive opening. The linkage has different selector holes for changing the opening speed and can be fine tuned with the adjustable linkage.

Rounding out the additional benefits includes teflon-coated slabbed throttle shafts with lower profile screws for improved airflow, hand polished venturi inlets, and 12 hole billet booster inserts to allow for better fuel atomization plus crisp throttle response.


The new external linkage design makes changing the opening rate a breeze.


The Dominator metering blocks, featuring changeable idle feed restrictors, emulsion bleeds, and tunable power valve restrictors.


No more linkage here! Don’t worry about any loose parts coming down into your intake manifold.


Hand polished venturii inlets and 12 hole billet boosters.

Installing a 750 CFM Ultra Double Pumper

If you have been following Street Legal TV, you might have seen our Project: Riced Rat Rod 240sx. The stock fuel injected 2.4-liter has been yanked in place of a 400ci Dart SHP short block with Pro 1 Top End Kit. This light 5-speed equipped car makes 525 horsepower at the crank with a Holley 830 CFM HP carburetor. With an Ultra 75 CFM Double Pumper on hand, we wanted to see how it compared to the 830 HP.


Swapping the carburetors couldn’t be easier.We started by cracking the -8AN line at the regulator and soaking the fuel up with a shop rag. From there we removed the quick disconnect throttle bracket and return spring. Finally, the carburetor was set free by removing the four base plate mounting bolts.

Before we installed the Double Pumper we wanted to see what it weighed compared to the HP. The Ultra Double Pumper came in at about three pounds lighter, and don’t forget that the Double Pumper has components like the electric choke and choke tower that adds extra weight over the HP.


Reinstallation of the Ultra Series carburetor was just as simple as taking it off. The only other item we needed to add was a switch 12 volt wire for the electric choke. As the small block Chevy came back to life again, we were greeted with a healthy sounding idle thanks to Holley’s out-of-the-box tune.

Concluding our driving test, we found that the cold start idling did not require us to sit with the car for a few minutes while we warmed it up. Also, we were pleased to note that the partial throttle drivability was enhanced. The 830 HP performed with slightly crisper throttle response and more ‘seat of the pants’ horsepower above 5,000 rpm. The tough decision comes down to determining exactly what you are looking for out of your vehicle.

Project Grandma – Testing the Ultra Series 3-Circuit Dominator

Since we tried out one of the street carburetors on one of our street cars, we decided it would only be fitting for us to try out one of the Dominators on one of our race cars. The lucky vehicle that will be undergoing this test is Project Grandma, our 555 cubic inch Musi/Edelbrock big block Chevy-powered Malibu.

The carburetor of choice is the 1050 CFM 3-circuit version. While 3-circuit isn’t really designed for a street car, it will work perfectly for our Malibu that only spends its time at the track. The extra circuit adds an intermediate circuit between the idle and main. This allows us to adjust the carburetor’s intermediate circuit to tune the air/fuel ratio on the transbrake for a crisp delivery to the main circuit when the button is released. This will keep the car from bogging while on the trans-brake when releasing it.


More to Come From Holley in the Future!

Even though the Ultra line was a significant revelation to Holley’s line of carburetors, there are plans to continue pushing still further. “Look for more to come soon,” McFarland told us. “We plan on expanding out into the bigger CFM on the street carburetors – including a 570 and 870 Avenger as well as 600 and 850 Double Pumpers.” Both of these CFM ranges will be offered in both the standard zinc and Ultra line of aluminum carburetors.

Source

Holley
Web: www.holley.com
Phone: (270) 781-9741

Few can argue that the late model Mustang is one of the most personalized cars in the market today. From body kits, to wheels, to engine upgrades, fans of the Mustang can encounter a variety of aftermarket add-ons when you attend a Mustang car show, flip through the pages of any Mustang niche magazine or spend an hour on the StangTV website.

One new product that takes personalization to a new level is a custom sill (a.k.a. scuff plate) for the late model Mustang. Once looked at as an afterthought when customizing the Mustang interior, new advances in technology can turn the “door step” to your Mustang into a personalized billboard.

The scuff plates are manufactured by Michigan based Interlum and can be custom ordered with any name or motto plus a number of Mustang themed logos. In addition to being cool, the plates are built from OEM quality materials since the company manufactures scuff plates already for Ford, Lincoln and many other OE manufacturers.

We were invited to Interlum’s Plymouth, Michigan custom shop to see how the personalized scuff plates were made and to meet the team that developed the unique product. Mike Judge is the owner of Interlum and has been busy over the past few months launching the product and developing the process to custom order the plates.

A few months ago, www.fordcustomscuffplates.com was launched and the site allows a customer to select what script and logo they want on their personalized sill plate order. If a computer is not accessable, a 1-800 line has been set-up to order, the number to call is 1-800-367-3788. The scuff plates retail for $199.95, not a bad deal considering they are personalized, include LED lighting and made just like the OEM Ford units.


The Interlum technician sets up the nameplate material in Corel Draw, a program used by the laser-engraving machine to etch the material.

Once Interlum receives the order, a technician sets up the nameplate material in Corel Draw, a program used by the laser-engraving machine to burn the top section of the material. For our custom plate, we brought the PowerTV logo eps file and selected the words “Turbo Mel” for the personalized section on the plate. Turbo Mel is a nickname for Melissa Lawrence’s Turbocharged 2010 Mustang daily driver. The Mustang is a current PowerTV project car that features a Hellion Turbo system. To balance out the plate, the layout technician selected a Ford Oval logo to the right of the script and after final sizing we were ready to engrave.


The raw personalized plate material looks similar to brushed steel and the laser etches the top silver layer leaving the clear bottom section untouched.


Interlum uses a laser engraver, a device similar to a laser printer, to create the plate section of the scuff plate.

Once the technician had the layout set, he instructed the Epilog Laser Engraver to start engraving. The laser engraver works similar to a laser printer but uses a beam of ultra-hot light as the engraving tool. The laser burns the top layer of the sheet and no part of the machinery actually touches the material being engraved. Laser engraving produces a permanent, crisp, highly detailed mark, engraving images at up to 1200 dots per inch.

In addition to engraving, the laser can also be instructed to cut the material. Once the Turbo Mel text and logos were engraved, the technician plotted off the final size of the sill plate and instructed to laser to cut out the plate.


Interlum’s owner Mike Judge checks the finished etched plate before final installation of the light pipe and scuff plate.

With the personalized plate section done, Interlum was ready to assemble all the sill plate components made up of the sill plate body, light pipe, wiring harness and personalized plate.

The sill plates feature an LED “light pipe” that runs the entire length of the script section and backlights the script when the interior lights are activated. At night the backlit plate really sets off the interior especially when the door is opened for entrance or exit. Interlum has developed the proprietary LED light pipe technology that casts an even light over the entire length of the plate. Combined with the Mustang’s MyColor interior option the color options are limitless.

Factory Scuff Plate Removal


The factory 2010 Mustang scuff plate features the Mustang logo and looks like every other 2010 Mustang GT rolling around town

The first step was removing the factory installed sill plate. This was accomplished by forcing the sill plate out of the snap points with a trim removal tool and unplugging the lighting connector. Its up to you to decide what you want to do with the old sill plates, the instructions showed a trash can symbol but we tend to hang onto things for craigslist or a future swapmeet.


The factory 2010 Mustang scuff plate was removed with the aid of a trim removal tool and the factory connector was unplugged.

Custom Scuff Plate Installation

The Interlum custom Mustang scuff plates came well packed in a custom box to prevent damage. Easy to follow instructions were included and we followed their step-by-step guide.

We took the new Interlum Custom sill plate out of the shipping box, laid them over the lower door seam and plugged in the OE lighting connector. One the electrical connector was solidly in place we snapped the scuff plate in place and removed the adhesive tape backing.


Prior to installing the scuff plate, we plugged in the new scuff plate electrical connector into the OE plug.


The adhesive tape backing is removed prior to securing the outer edge of the sill plate to the rocker panel.


The new Turbo Mel scuff plates look great and combined with the new logos add a personalized PowerTV touch to the car.

Contact Information:

Interlum/Ford Custom Scuff Plates
1-800-367-3788
www.fordcustomscuffplates.com

The challenge was laid out to me by the crew here at power TV: put together a potent naturally aspirated Ford Windsor based engine to topple the 666 horsepower mark for the in house Project 666 Mustang. In addition, it needed to be reliable as it creeped past the 7,500 RPM mark through all the gears. Not the simplest task, but not an unreasonable goal either. I took the challenge without hesitation, because not only have I put together thousands of engine combinations for customers here at Pro Power, but I thought it would be exciting to design the right combination of cubic inches, compression, and induction to meet the needs of the project.

Numbers were crunched, and a nasty 427 cubic inch is what I ended up designing. I wanted to make sure we had a big bore (4.125”) with a fair amount of stroke (4.000”) and 427 just happens to be a really cool Ford displacement to have in between your frame rails. We needed a good amount of air flow and the right mechanical roller camshaft to make the power in the proper RPM range.


The Dart aluminum block filled with goodies from Lunati and JE sits on the engine stand ready for the top end parts to complete the long block.

This segment, as the title implies, is part two of a three part story covering the buildup of our 427 Windsor engine. In part one, we covered all of the parts and construction of the short block which included a Dart Aluminum 9.500” deck block as a base. We added the rotating assembly using a Pro Series Lunati crankshaft, Lunati Superlight 4340 connecting rods, and JE custom domed pistons and rings all riding on a set of King bearings. We also degreed in our custom Comp Cams roller camshaft, timing set, and roller thrust plate. Then we added the TCI Rattler balancer to keep it balanced with a Melling Select oil pump to keep everything lubricated. ARP fasteners held all of it together with the appropriate gaskets sealing up the crank and timing cover.

For the second part of our story, we are ready to add our top end parts: heads, lifters, rockers, pushrods, head gaskets, head studs, intake manifold, and valve covers. Here are the components that we chose:

  • ARP Stainless Intake Bolts: 454-2101
  • Cometic MLS Head Gaskets: C5483-040
  • Comp Cams Endure-X Roller Lifters: 890C-1
  • Comp Cams Roller Lifter Link Bars: 838L-1
  • Comp Cams Ultra Gold Roller Rockers: 19044-16
  • Dart Head Stud Kit: 66130121
  • Edelbrock Super Victor EFI Intake, ported by Wilson Manifolds: 29245
  • Felpro Intake Gaskets: 1262R
  • Felpro Valve Cover Gaskets: 1684
  • Pro Power Prime One 1pc Pushrods: 858700M
  • Trick Flow High Port Race CNC Cylinder Heads: 5170T010-C01
  • Trick Flow Fabricated Aluminum Valve Covers: 51400804

I chose all of the correct components to complete the long block and continued with the expert help of Ronnie Wilson from Specialties Machining for the long block assembly. Later, in part three, the engine will get expertly placed into the Project 666 Mustang which will be tuned on the dyno so we can see the results of all of our efforts.

Stud Service

With our short block complete and sitting on the stand, Ronnie quickly got to work screwing in our head studs that would secure the heads tightly against our Dart aluminum block with the high cylinder pressures that our 427 would see. This was no regular set of head studs, but a special set that had arrived directly from the shelves at Dart Machinery. I had previously found the installation instructions for our aluminum block on Dart’s website while I was hunting for the parts we would need for this project. To my delight, the website clearly stated in black and white what the exact stud specifications for this block were.


Ronnie Wilson tapped the head dowels into place then began screwing the Dart special studs into the deck of the block.

The Dart aluminum blocks use a special bottom length head stud that is ½” in diameter with a 1.780” overall length including a .300” long special bullet end. It was as simple as a phone call to the Dart techs to set us up with the correct stud kit for our aluminum block and Trick Flow High Port Race CNC heads. Their black oxidized stud kits are top notch, manufactured from the finest chrome molly steel. They are available with standard hex or twelve point nuts and have the correct dimensions on the bottom to fit the aluminum block.


It is important to use the correct stud for the block and heads being used. In this case, the Dart aluminum block required a special bullet nose for the block end of the head studs.

With the perfect studs in hand, Ronnie from Specialties Machining began screwing them into the block. They were then hand tightened into the block because a stud is designed to securely “clamp” the heads into place by utilizing force throughout the entire stud instead of stressing the threads in the block like bolts typically end up doing. Studs are really the best choice for high combustion pressures and for evenly distributing the clamping on the heads since they help keep the heads even and they reduce the chances of head gasket failure.


Cometic MLS gaskets are the latest in sealing technology. With the multiple layers of steel, Cometic can provide gaskets for Windsor Fords in varying thicknesses from .027″ to .120″ thick.

Seal of Approval

Of course, we didn’t want the head gasket to fail on a performance engine like our 427 project, so we knew it was important to use a high quality gasket. Cometic has been one of the leaders in head gasket technology with their MLS (Multi Layer Steel) head gaskets, and it is the most popular gasket we sell at Pro Power. Their head gaskets feature two embossed viton coated stainless steel layers sandwiched around another variable stainless layer inside.

The gaskets are designed to work with any type of material block or cylinder heads, and they are available in a variety of bore sizes and thicknesses. They require no retorque after initial tightening. The gaskets are a great alternative for high sealing with high cylinder pressures and don’t require any o-rings or special work to seal water and oil passages. The nice thing is that not only does Cometic have a superior part, but as a catalog item, the 4.155” bore x .040” thick gaskets were already in-stock on the Pro Power shelves.


Cometic gaskets are available in a variety of bore sizes to fit correctly on any size hole, plus they require no sealer for water or oil and they do not have to be retorqued.

Rolling On

Although it may have seemed that we were ready for the heads at this point, Ronnie pointed out how he preferred to drop the lifters in next because it was easier with the heads out of the way. Ronnie had pre-assembled the Comp Cams Endure-X lifters with the appropriate link bars and slid them down onto the solid roller custom Comp Cams camshaft with some assembly lube.


The Comp Cams Endure-X lifters feature their patented captured link bar which, as Ronnie pointed out, always go towards the valley of the engine. Ronnie likes to use a good amount of assembly lubricant when installing the lifters to ensure low wear on first start-up.

The Comp Cams Endure-X mechanical roller lifters were chosen because of their excellent features for our application. I wanted to use a lifter that would have great endurance, and these lifters had all of the proper features. First, they had EDM Oil Injection Technology which introduces a consistent full flow of oil to the needle bearings around the roller wheel. Next, they had tool steel axles and precision sorted bearings which means a long life at 7500 plus RPM. Also, the lifters were available in a tall design which keeps our push rod and flex down to a minimum as well as having a cut away body to reduce overall valve train weight. With the lifters, studs, and gaskets already on the block and waiting, Ronnie was then ready to install the cylinder heads.

Let it Breathe

For any engine, the cylinder heads are very relevant to how much power can be produced. The engine is merely an air pump, and the more air you can get in, the more power the engine can make. For our 427 incher, though, the volume of air was most important because it would be naturally aspirated. Blowers and turbos force air under pressure through any size hole deep into the cylinders. However, naturally aspirated engines require the air to be drawn into the cylinders. Intake and exhaust ports have to be very efficient and be able to hold enough volume to feed 427 cubes at 7500 RPM without choking down the power. The ports, valves, and chamber must be optimized for maximum airflow. That is one of the reasons I chose the larger 4.125” bore: to unshroud the intake valves as they opened next to the cylinder in order to allow more airflow.


The entire intake and exhaust ports are expertly CNC machined for optimum flow at Trick Flow. The exhaust ports measure out at a massive 95cc flowing 250 plus cfm of air. Note the dual bolt pattern on the exhaust face allowing use of big tube headers.

There are literally dozens of small block Ford heads out there in the aftermarket, and many of them are a great design out of the box. These out of the box heads, however, simply didn’t fit our needs. In years past, for an engine like this we would buy a pair of shelf heads, round up the appropriate parts for our roller cam, and ship them off to a head porter to tweak them out for better airflow. This typically takes a lot of time and money to ensure that the engine ends up with the proper airflow characteristics. What a relief to no longer have to do that!

With Trick Flow and their line of CNC ported cylinder heads, we no longer had to waste time and energy. For years I had used their High Port heads with great success, but now they conveniently offer that same tried and true head with full CNC porting at a great value. The heads are available in several configurations with 58cc or 70cc chambers, as well as bare or assembled for hydraulic or mechanical roller camshafts. Plus, Trick Flow keeps them stocked on the shelf ready to ship whenever they’re ordered so that an engine project of this magnitude won’t get stalled for weeks waiting on the head porter.

Plus, the heads flow great numbers:

.100-inch lift: 70 cfm intake, 58 cfm exhaust
.200-inch lift: 144 cfm intake, 113 cfm exhaust
.300-inch lift: 214 cfm intake, 161 cfm exhaust
.400-inch lift, 267 cfm intake, 208 cfm exhaust
.500-inch lift, 302 cfm intake, 233 cfm exhaust
.600-inch lift, 320 cfm intake, 245 cfm exhaust
.700-inch lift, 333 cfm intake, 255 cfm exhaust


When dry fitting the heads to the block, Ronnie found a small amount of interference between the dome on the JE pistons and the chamber. With a few minutes of “massaging”, he was able to get the heads to fit the dome perfectly.

I had previously picked out the correct part number heads that came with 58cc chambers, bronze valve guides, interlocking ductile iron seats, and huge 225cc intake runners. These heads are completely assembled with 2.080” and 1.600” stainless steel valves and 1.560” roller springs with 240lbs of seat pressure and 600lbs open pressure which is perfect for the custom Comp Cam sitting in the block.

The heads are also put together with titanium 10 degree retainers, machined locks, viton seals, spring cups, ARP 7/16” large rocker studs, and 5/16” guide plates. The CNC ports and chambers intake airflow measures up at 335cfm at .700” lift, and the 95cc exhaust ports flow 257cfm which means that the Trick Flow heads are capable of supporting exceptional amounts of horsepower. Better yet, these flow numbers were achieved with a tiny 4.030” bore. Typically, going up to the larger 4.125” bore found on our Dart block increases airflow by approximately ten percent! The best part is that they come ready to install and with the right parts for this 427 project.


The engineers at Trick Flow really did a great job of offering a head with the correct parts for racing engines. The 1.560″ dual springs are setup at 240lbs. at the seat and 600 lbs. open, and they come complete with ten degree titanium retainers.

With heads in hand, Ronnie gently slid them into place over the studs first on the passenger side, then on the driver side. He had previously checked fitment in his dry assembly of the block and made sure that the valves had plenty of room to open in the notches of our JE pistons. Torquing them tightly to the block was the next step, which he did using Dart’s 12 point nuts and hardened washers. Next up were the rocker arms and pushrods.


Now with the chambers clearing the domes and the lifters in, Ronnie carefully put the Trick Flow heads into place on the block.

Pushing It

We couldn’t do anything regarding push rods until we actually got the engine to this point in order to measure for the exact push rod length needed. There are many variables that dictate push rod length: camshaft base circle, lifter height, block height, cylinder head, valve length, rocker arm, etc. All of these different components can change which length push rod is needed for each particular engine. After some quick measurements with our rockers and an adjustable push rod, Ronnie came up with the length we needed of 8.700”.


Ronnie purposely left the guide plates and studs off of the heads until they were on the block. That way he was able to align them perfectly before torquing the rocker studs into the heads with thread sealer.

The Project 666 Windsor engine was going to see 7500 RPM and had about 600 pounds of open spring pressure. That meant that we could use a good quality 5/16” push rod. If higher spring pressures and RPM were in the future, an upgrade to 3/8” diameter rods would be necessary. Luckily, we stock the Prime One chrome molly push rods in every .050” in length from about six inches to over nine inches. We whipped out sixteen of them from the shelf bin, and Ronnie slid them into the Comp Cams lifters.

Not Grandpa’s Rocker

Our rocker choice was no problem since we were dealing with Comp Cams. They now offer a new series of rocker arms labeled “Ultra Gold” that are perfect for this Ford engine. They are a premium series of aluminum rockers that are precision CNC machined to strict tolerances that yield unrivaled quality and ratio accuracy. The Ultra Gold rockers are proven to withstand extremely aggressive spring pressure and lift and are backed by a lifetime warranty.


The Comp Cams “Ultra Gold” rocker arms aren’t just pretty, they are pretty strong too. These rocker arms are more than capable of holding up to the 600 lbs. of spring pressure on the Trick Flow heads and are mounted over beefy 7/16″ ARP rocker studs.

Ronnie placed the 1.6 ratio rockers onto our 7/16” studs and over the push rods. He then went through his valve adjustment routine. Of course, the Comp Cams Ultra Gold rockers fit with no problems since they are clearanced for up to a 1.650” valve spring diameter. Ronnie then made the intake and lash adjustments according to the cam card in an orderly fashion and in no time had the valve train in place and rotating beautifully.


An old pro like Ronnie from Specialties Machining knows how to adjust the valves quickly and accurately. Our Comp Cams custom roller required .026″ lash. After adjusting, the Comp Cams rocker nuts get locked into place with the inner set screws.

Intake the Fresh Air

Next up was our big bad intake manifold. An engine like this one needed to breathe, and nobody directs the fuel and air mixture into the ports like Edelbrock. Their Super Victor intake manifold for the 9.500” deck was ideal for the induction needs of our 427 project. We are planning on eventually adding a carburetor to the top of this engine, but just in case fuel injection is in the future, Edelbrock offers an EFI version of this intake that is pre-machined for fuel injectors and fuel rails with an elbow bolted to the carb pad.


Extensive porting work was done to this Edelbrock Super Victor manifold by the Wilson Manifolds crew to maximize airflow and mixture. Note the fine polished look inside the plenum.

Luckily, the guys back in California just happened to have an intake on hand that was not only the same Super Victor that was needed, but it also had been fully ported by the artists at Wilson Manifolds. This was indeed a great find because the ports and plenum had already been opened up to maximize airflow and just happened to be the same size as our ports on the Trick Flow CNC ported heads.

Ronnie cleaned the intake up and then lowered it between the heads. Sandwiched between the heads and intake were a pair of Felpro 1262R intake gaskets that Trick Flow recommended to match their ports. After checking for a perfect fit, Ronnie then torqued the intake down tightly with ARP stainless steel hardware.


Ronnie torqued the Edelbrock intake to the heads with Felpro 1262R gaskets and ARP stainless steel intake bolts.

Covering Up

To clear the roller rockers and also for a great racy look, we got a pair of Trick Flow fabricated aluminum valve covers. These covers are not only lightweight, but are also very tall for clearing all types of rockers and stud girdles. Also, they are mounted through tubes that are welded in from the top of the cover to the rail for rail stiffness and great gasket sealing. They are finished in natural aluminum with an embossed Trick Flow logo which makes them look awesome. Ronnie installed a pair of Felpro rubber valve cover gaskets in between the Trick Flow tall covers and tightened them down over the rockers with the supplied cover hardware.


The fabricated aluminum Trick Flow valve covers are really light weight, and the wide open tall space inside clears most valve train hardware with ease.

This completes the coverage of part two of the Project 666 long block build at Specialties Machining. After crating up the incomplete engine and shipping it out to the Power TV garage, the missing oil pan, carb, and accessories will be added to it so that it can be dropped into the Project 666 Mustang. Part three of this story will really get exciting when the nasty 427 is placed on the chassis dyno to see if the combination we chose will achieve those elusive 666 plus horsepower numbers we are aiming for!


The Nasty 427 long block is together and looking fast on the stand. A few minor parts will complete the engine so it can be flogged on the dyno in the Project 666 Mustang.

Sources:

ARP
Phone: 800.826.3045
www.arp-bolts.com

Cometic Gasket
Phone: 800.752.9850
www.cometic.com

Comp Cams
Phone: 800.999.0853
www.compcams.com

Dart Machinery
Phone: 248.362.1188
www.dartheads.com

Edelbrock
Phone: 800.416.8628
www.edelbrock.com

ProPower Performance Parts
Phone: 954.491.6988
www.propowerparts.com

Specialties Machining
Phone: 954.942.5202
www.specialtiesmachining.com

Trick Flow
Phone: 330.630.1555
www.trickflow.com

Wilson Manifolds
Phone: 954.771.6216
www.wilsonmanifolds.com

Anyone with a tired Fox Body learns to deal with some of the inherent flaws of the time. Time is definitely not on the Fox platform’s side, but luckily there are plenty of aftermarket companies that can help you revitalize your Stang. One of those companies is B&M. A name synonymous for muscle-cars and hot rods, B&M has a rich history of producing some of the most advanced shifters and shifter components around.

A B&M shifter had already been previously installed in our project car. However, over the test of time and 100,000 some odd shifts, it was about time for an upgrade. So, it only made sense to replace the older shifter with one of B&M’s flagship products….The T5 Pro Ripper. Follow along as I do an installed of a Pro Ripper shifter on a Fox Body – step by step.

The B&M Pro Ripper Manual Shifter (PN – 45070) is a work of art. While providing smooth and precise shifts to the T-5, it also reduces shift throw considerably and seems utterly unbreakable. The Pro Ripper has unlimited adjustability by way of its 3 piece top stick and allows the user to mount the shifter virtually anywhere. I’m all about comfort in whatever car I drive and don’t think that a brazen street beast needs to be a hassle to drive. That’s why I was looking forward to installing the Pro Ripper in our project car.


New B&M ripper on the left, old B&M shifter on the right.

The project ’85 Mustang for this job is by no means a street beast, but anything that can help that T 5 shift smoother and shorter is a welcomed addition.

When shopping for an aftermarket shifter, be sure to check that it fits your application. Thankfully, B&M makes purchasing their products quick and easy with an application search on their homepage at bmracing.com. When beginning the installation, be sure to check out the instructions provided because there are plenty of well illustrated pictures depicting each step of the installation process.

The Pro Ripper Shifter includes:

• CNC machined stainless steel stick assembly
• Fully adjustable stick design
• Stainless steel collar
• Spherical glass filled nylon pivot ball
• Transmission fill plug in base

According to the manual, the installation of the Pro Ripper should take around an hour. However, once you open the box and see the ridiculously detailed instructions inside, you will realize that this estimate of time is quite generous.

Some of the Tools You Will Need

• 8, 10, and 13mm Sockets
• Hex Wrench
• Ratchet Driver
• Wrench
• RTV Silicone

Before beginning the installation of your Pro Ripper, remove the old shifter from the car and inspect the area where you will be attaching the new piece. Perform any necessary clean-up at this time.


Next, follow the assembly instructions very carefully and make sure to Loc-Tite the hex bolts in order to prevent the pieces from backing themselves out.


Once the Pro Ripper is assembled, use the provided shifter cup to replace the old worn out one. This will help ensure smooth and concise shifts.

The next step is to lower the shifter base into position, making sure to RTV the base before securing the Ripper to the transmission.


The Pro Ripper comes with some beefy adjustable Jam Nuts and softer springs, in order for you to customize your Ripper to your liking. Personally, I like a somewhat stock feel with a short throw, so I kept the soft springs in the base itself and opted out of replacing them with hard springs as per the instructions.

Following the instructions, you have the choice between a High Stick with a longer throw, or a Low Stick with a shorter throw. When you get to this step, be sure that the throw itself doesn’t get interrupted by anything on your center console.

Now that you are in the clear, attach the upper stick to the corresponding holes. In my particular case I went with a High Stick/longer throw since this will come in handy while downshifting those long straights! Making sure to Loc-Tite the button head bolts first, proceed to attach the threaded adapter to the upper stick and repeat the Loc-Tite process to prevent any of the screws from backing out.


The B&M Pro Ripper not only looks stunning, but it outperforms the stock shifter by a mile. The quality CNC machined stainless steel material, limitless adjustability, and overall darn good looks make the Pro Ripper a true winner when it comes to rugged street/strip performance!

Now that the Pro Ripper is installed and the ball shifter is mounted, that little T-5 won’t know what hit it!

Source:

B&M Racing
Phone: 818-882-6322
Site: http://www.bmracing.com

SRP’s New Professional Piston Series

Friday, January 22nd, 2010
When it comes to making solid reliable power in a engine, choosing the right piston is always at the top of mind. Needless to say, we were excited when JE Pistons announced that they were going to be applying their massive knowledge of piston technology to take their existing affordable budget SRP piston and upgrade into the more beefy SRP Professional line. Let’s take a look at the new SRP Professional series – we even put together a video for you that tells you everything you need to know but were afraid to ask:

Both the original SRP and SRP Professional pistons are offered for many popular engines including the Ford Modular, LSX, and of course the old school traditional stuff. Both are “off the shelf” pistons meaning there are part numbers and these pistons are kept in stock by major mail order outfits. So what is the same, and what is different?

While both SRP and SRP Professional pistons are forged from premium aluminum alloy for strength, there is a substantial evolution in design with the SRP Professional. Well over a year was spent by JE’s engineering team building a lighter piston incorporating many of the “tricks” that are often designed into custom JE pistons.

Let’s take a closer look at the SRP Professional.

SRP Professional: Evolution of a Shelf Piston

SRP’s new Professional Series truly does blur the line between catalog pistons and custom race slugs. The Professional forgings are completely “clean sheet” designs, that feature much shorter piston skirts, a reduced-skirt package that reduces friction and weight, and are actually engineered to take more horsepower than the original SRP.

The forging also features the “FSR” process which is Forged Side Reliefs – that aid in the ring seal while decreasing the risks of stress cracks. The accumulator groove is also improved to help promote a better ring seal to keep combustion in their place inside the cylinders – where they belong!

JE also decided to include on their SRP line a brand new skirt coating standard that reduces friction and wear in performance engines.

The JE Pro Seal ring package for the Professional series is redesigned from the standard SRP line to accept a much higher end set of rings – thinner for less drag and more power. The SRP Professional’s sport a 1.2 mm top ring, Napier 2nd ring, and a 3.0 mm standard tension oil ring which is the same width ring package as the LS7 Corvette engine. All rings included with SRP’s Pro’s are standard fit – no file fitting here. This means if you need custom fitment you either need to buy another set of rings or go custom.

A Weighty Matter?

SRP’s Pro Line is lighter, and capable of increased RPM. How much lighter? It can be up to 200 grams or even more in some designs – thanks to the before-mentioned changes to the forging, but also the shorter pin and lock packages. This pistons feature a 2.250” pin which reduces overall weight, while still maintaining plenty of strength to hold the piston to its rod. This is done by using a shorter, but sturdier pin.

So, the big question is — is there horsepower to be gained from these improvements.

Final Words

JE tested a small block Chevrolet engines with back-to-back dyno runs to compare the same “piston type” – with the only differences being that one was a SRP Professional and the other piston was an SRP Piston.

“We used a 383 cubic inch small block Chevy,” explained Sean Crawford, JE’s Marketing Director. “With a 3.75-inch stroke, 6-inch rod, and 4.030 bore, it’s probably the most commonly built street engine you could find.” “We started with the standard SRP (part number 138093), and then swapped it out with the SRP Professional version (part number 268830).”

JE reports the engine picked up 10 peak horsepower with no other changes, due to the lighter weight of the piston, decreases friction, and better ring package. That’s impressive power for the cost difference of the pistons.

JE is going to continue to make the SRP piston for the true budget enthusiast that simply needs an inexpensive forged piston but doesn’t need to make maximum power. But if you care about your dyno sheet, and don’t need or want to spend the money on a custom piston, you can’t go from with the JE SRP Professional.

Source:

JE/SRP Pistons
Web: www.srp.com
Phone: 714-898-9763

Flowmaster’s 2010 Mustang S197 Upgrade

Saturday, January 16th, 2010
We’ve been Mustang enthusiasts for quite a while and have attended hundreds of Mustang events. That being said, we’ll venture a bet that one of the first performance modifications made by a Mustang owner is to install a set of Flowmaster mufflers on the new ride. While the factory exhaust system does get the message across that you’re packing a V8, the distinct sound of Flowmaster mufflers ensures that everyone knows it. When the 2010 Mustang came out, we decided to do a quick Flowmaster install to see how the Flowmaster sound and performance stacked up on Ford’s newest Pony.

Flowmaster has been building Mustang exhausts since the mid 1980’s, and they’ve spent countless hours perfecting the sound of their Mustang exhaust systems. That “Flowmaster Sound” is recognized not only on the streets but also at the racetrack as the manufacturer has been very supportive of grassroots drag racing.

As any new Mustang owner with a performance pulse wonders, we were curious to see how the 3-valve 4.6 Liter Modular engine in our 2010 Mustang would sound with a Flowmaster exhaust. We decided to pick up the phone and order their S197 Mustang Stainless Steel Exhaust System – Part Number: 817460.

The Exhaust – Mustang Stainless Steel Exhaust – Part Number: 817460

We got right to work on installing a new Flowmaster 409S Stainless Exhaust System on our Sterling Gray Metallic 2010 Mustang GT project car. Out of the box, the bolt-on system included two American Thunder “Classic Series” Mufflers and stainless steel exhaust tips. The Classic Series mufflers are duplications of Flowmaster founder Ray Fluggers’ original square “Suitcase” mufflers that started it all.

The mufflers are hand-crafted and formed with the original tooling that has been in Flowmaster’s production facility for 25 years. Unlike the originals, however, these units are constructed with 409S stainless steel in order to last a lifetime. The square muffler case with its wider profile produces an extra deep tone that helps broadcast that trademark Flowmaster Sound.

Stock Muffler Removal:

The first step in installing our Flowmaster axle back exhaust was to get the Mustang up in the air with a lift or jackstands. After the car was on the stands and cooled down, we sprayed some penetrating fluid (WD40 or Liquid Wrench) on the OEM exhaust bolts to aid in their removal. Fortunately, our 2010 Mustang’s exhaust bolts were a cinch to remove and didn’t really require the fluid. However, if you’re working on any Mustang that’s a year or two older, spraying some penetrating fluid on the bolts is highly recommended in order to aide in easier removal.

Next, we grabbed a wrench and a 15mm socket to loosen the nuts on the OEM clamped pipe connection between the mufflers and the over-axle pipe. Once the clamps were loose, it was time to move on to the muffler hanger removal. The Mustang muffler has two reusable rubber hangers that mount it to the frame, so we were very careful not to tweak the hanger assembly during removal.

A 13mm socket was used to remove the bolts that secure the muffler hangers to the Mustang frame.

After removing the two hangers on each side of the frame, we slid the OE muffler off of the over-axle pipe and set the factory muffler aside.

With the hanger bolts easily accessable, we removed the mounts off of the stock muffler and put them onto the new Flowmaster mufflers.

Installation:

Before we started reinstalling the new parts, we prepped the clamps supplied in the Flowmaster hardware kit by removing the nuts and applying lubricant to the threads. This makes for smoother tightening during the installation process.

We then placed the supplied Flowmaster ring clamps onto the inlet pipe of the Flowmaster left muffler and slid the muffler onto the OEM over-axle pipe. The left muffler hanger mounts were then put back into position on the frame, and we reinstalled the factory bolts. To tighten the hanger bolts above the muffler, a 13mm open end wrench is the best tool to reach the bolts.

Once the hangers were in place, we leveled the muffler with the exhaust piping and tightened the clamp on the muffler inlet enough to hold it but still allow for adjustment. We repeated the process for the right muffler and prepared for the final adjustment.

Once the Flowmaster mufflers were in place and semi-tight, we adjusted the position of the mufflers for final tightening. We checked the position of the exhaust tips in the Mustang’s rear fascia exhaust cutout. Keep in mind that the tips do generate heat, and if the tip is too close to the rear fascia material the paint and fascia will burn. Flowmaster says a minimum of ½ inch clearance around all parts of the system must be maintained. This clearance is also applied to suspension parts with potential noise and vibration in mind.

After the final adjustments were made and the clearances were checked, we securely tightened all clamps.

With our project Mustang still on the lift, we fired up the engine, checked for any possible exhaust leaks, and soon cracked satisfied smiles after hearing that trademark Flowmaster idle. Revving the engine created that awesome chambered muffler sound we’ve all come to appreciate. We eagerly took the car out for a test drive to check for any squeaks and rattles and excitedly noted that the exhaust was around 15-20% louder than stock. Mission accomplished!

Source:

Flowmaster
1-800-544-4761
www.flowmastermufflers.com

2003 Cobra: Fixing the Snake with 850 HP

Saturday, January 16th, 2010
The late model Mustang that rings a bell in any blue oval enthusiast’s mind is the 2003-2004 Mustang Cobra. At 390 factory-rated horsepower, the supercharged 4.6-liter 4-valve modular engine produced more power than any other late model Mustang in history at the time. Not only were they fast from the factory, but they also took very well to mods.

Case in point, our white 2003 Cobra that ran in the 10-second range on all stock internals. With an upgraded Whipple supercharger, 20+ psi of boost, cat-back exhaust, injectors, upgraded throttle body, and headers, our 4.6L 4-Valve was making 640 rear wheel horsepower. The risk of failure comes with any factory short-block that you push the envelope with, and that is exactly what happened with our Cobra. During one ill-fated drag strip outing, we burned up a few pistons. Because of this, we yanked the engine out and sent it up the road for an overhaul to the well-known blue oval shop, Ford Performance Solutions.

Our goal was simple. 650-700 rear wheel horsepower, but with much lower boost, a more conservative tune-up, and ROCK solid reliability. To do that, we needed more air flow, bigger cams, and a purpose-built short-block that would take a pounding.

You’re probably very familiar with our Snake. The aforementioned 2003 Cobra was produced for two years beginning in ’03, signifying its 10-year SVT heritage by producing an over-the-top 32-valve, supercharged mod motor that made nearly 400 horsepower. Although there were nearly 20,000 Cobras built during those two years, they have maintained a higher value than any other mass produced late-model Mustang due to its brutal horsepower achievements in both stock or modified form.

Ford Performance Solutions Knows Mod Motors

“We had been building modular motors since 1995 after the Lincolns came out,” said FPS owner Troy Bowen. “We bought five of the test motors from Ford, and began dissecting them. We then went to Ross to custom make some pistons before anyone else made them. We even did CNC work on almost all the heads they had, even the Titan V-10s. We started getting popular with the Cobra heads and working with the guys that were doing forced induction on them. That’s how we got our start”

While pumping out over 670 horsepower to the wheels and running mid 10-second passes, the long block was performing unbelievably in pure stock form. While its fair share of fun would be had from this, it eventually went kaput. Detonation mixed with worn piston rings turned this Cobra into a 2-stroke engine, burning as much oil as it did gas. In addition to the worn rings, 4 melted valves and multiple lost valve guides added insult to injury.

It was time to rebuild the 4.6L step by step, using upgraded pistons and rings from JE Pistons, boring the block with fresh FPS machine work, and adding some of the best valve train components from COMP Cams, and Ferrea. We’ll even top her off with an Aeromotive Fuel Rail kit, and we’ll be ready to lay down 650+ reliable horsepower that will actually live without eating itself.

The Build: Bottoms Up

Let’s start out by reviewing what components we are going to be using in the bottom end of our 4.6L:

  • JE Pistons 9.2:1 Compression for Supercharged Applications
  • JE Pro Seal Rings
  • Manley Rods (Stock) – Resized
  • Stock Crank (Forged Steel)
  • Pacific Performance Head Stud Kit #1564101
  • Pacific Performance Main Stud Kit #1565401

The first course of action to remedy the problem was to get the stock engine torn completely down. When Ford made the supercharged ‘OE Cobra 4-valve, they opted for an iron block in order to increase strength for the boosted application. “The 2 versus 4-valve blocks are very similar, though the 3-valve blocks are almost their own block and makes part interchanging difficult,” Troy says. The only cleanup needed on the block was a slight .020 over-bore done on the sleeves at FPS. Head bolts were trashed in favor of a Pacific Performance 8740 chrome moly studs and for the bottom end, the mains received a similar chrome moly stud kit. The stock crank (forged steel) and Manley rods were reused, and then it was time for the pistons.

We went to no one other than JE Pistons for some of their finest slugs designed for the 4.6L Modular engine. JE built us a set of custom pistons forged and CNC machined from 2618 Aluminum. These were designed for use with supercharged applications (as well as nitrous or turbo) and utilize 1.5mm, 1.5mm, 3mm rings. JE also include the pins, spirolox, and a full set of JE Pro Seal rings.



The JE 9.2:1 dish pistons are intended for a 3.552-inch bore. The tops of the pistons have been thermal coated to help prevent further detonation, and the skirts have a dry film lubricant to aid in any oil starvation problems in the cylinders.


FPS Engine Builder “Sam, the Super Man” sets the ring gap in the cylinders before installing the JE Pro Seal rings on the pistons

Hung to the JE pistons are the stock Manley H-beam rods. Ford went with these premium rods in order to ensure years of problem free service, and these were going to be more than adequate for our power needs. The crank is again a reused stock Forged Cobra crank that was cleaned and micro polished, and finishing up the short block was a set of OEM main bearings. Now, it was on to the long-block . . .


Long-Block Dreaming

Horsepower is almost always in the long-block. To that end, our major upgrades were a full set of COMP 4.6L 4-valve Modular camshafts, CNC-ported 4V heads, Ferrea stainless valves, and COMP valvetrain. All of those would help the 3.3-liter Whipple make big efficient power, with the Aeromotive Fuel Rails providing the fueling.

Here’s what we used:

  • Ferrea 37mm stainless intake valves #F1450P
  • Ferrea 30mm stainless exhaust valves #F1451P
  • Ford Performance Solutions, Complete CNC Portinp
  • Comp Cams Beehive Valve Springs – 324 lb/in Rate #26123
  • Comp Cams Titanium Retainers – 798-32
  • Comp Cams Modular Camshafts – 106360 – XE266BH-116
  • Aeromotive Fuel Rail Kit – 14122

Let’s start with the CNC-ported 4V cylinder heads from FPS:

Again, as with the block, the heads were torn down to bare castings, and the first action was to weld up and repair the melted combustion chambers. From there, it was time for some machining, starting with a valve job to accommodate the fresh Ferrea valves that were going to be installed. The final machine that the heads made their way to was the CNC. Both the intake and exhaust ports got a moderate porting job to help flow the larger amounts of air being crammed into and out of the cylinders.

The stock intake ports originally flowed at 238 CFM at .800 lift and now flow 293 CFM, a 50+ cfm increase. The exhaust ports increased even more with 165 CFM at .600 stock and then 253 CFM ported. “The 2-valves are very limited in the short turn areas of the head,” Bowen stated. “The low floor as it rolls into the port is flat, and goes right down into the valve seat. The 4-valve has so much more area, it is just like a pocket of valves. We have picked up over 100 more CFM in porting. We have got them up to 325 CFM on the intake port. The 4-valve 5.4-liter GT heads are even nicer, as they raised the floor to help out with the short turn.”


4-Valve Valvetrain: Double the Fun

When building a 4-valve over head cam engine, you get double the fun. Double the valves, double the cams.. and double the complexity. Luckily we had some good partners like Ferrea and Comp Cams.

Assembling the heads started with new bronze valve guides wrapped around Ferrea’s Competition Plus 4.6L Modular intake and exhaust valves. We settled on 37-mm on the intake and 30mm on the exhaust side, which are stock OEM replacements. These valves feature top of the line heat treating, and can even be used with the OE-style multi-groove style keepers. Other features include hard chrome stems, swirl-polished and under-cut stems, and cobalt-hard tips.

Controlling those Ferrea’s valve movement was a set of Comp Cam’s latest Modular Beehive “Ovate-design” valve springs, good for up to a .500-inch lift cam. Plus, they don’t require any machine work to fit.. yup they go right into the stock spring seats. They offer 90 lbs of seat load @1.47-inch of installed height, and 252 lbss of open load @ .970-inch installed height. The valve springs were held in place with Comp Cams Titanium retainers, lighter than the stock steel stainless retainers, and are also heat-treated to increase strength to the 6AL4V alloy.

Next up, something to snap open and then close those Ferrea valves: four of the very finest of Comp Cams “XE-R” 4-valve camshafts. The cams we selected are perfectly suited for a supercharged street car like our Cobra, while also having favorable attributes for the 1320. This cam is a stocking cam for COMP, and it’s optimized with a 116-LSA for forced induction like we mentioned, with a 1,500-6,000 rpm curve.

It was time to sandwich the heads and block together with our Cometic MLS head gaskets. Next, it was time to move to the timing chains since this was a DOHC engine. It’s important to make sure you TDC the engine and mark the chains so they are in the right place. Being off even just one tooth on your chain can result in a bent valve.

With the engine flipped on its head, Sam installed our new Canton Racing Products 7-quart oil pan. The pan allows us to keep the engine temperature lower while keeping the oil close to the pick up with the anti-slosh baffle. There is also a 1/2” NPT hole in the pan for adding an oil temperature gauge down the road.

For increased induction, we had to start with the additional fueling needed. The new 72 lb injectors were secured by Aeromotive’s new fuel rail kit that was designed specifically for the 4-valve power plant. Aeromotive includes all the lines and fittings you need, even a convenient adapter piece that will utilize the factory fuel pressure sensor.

To aid in the Cobra’s previous power, the blower was already upgraded to a 2.3-liter Whipple Charger that saw over 20 psi. But in an effort to cram even more boost into the motor, we upgraded the blower to Whipple’s 3.3-liter version that can produce up to 30 psi, which is approximately the same power as the 2.3-liter, but on less boost.



Final Thoughts

Now that our engine build was coming to close, we asked Troy what he thought the potential for this engine was, and what we should have learned. “First off, you did the right thing by putting good JE pistons and good rings in it,” Troy said. “Next, you addressed the head and intake flow with the ported CNC heads, and the Ferrea valves. Make sure good port work is done to the intake. Once the port is cleaned up and working right, it will help with the combustion problems. Finally, you picked some good mild cams. You don’t need to get aggressive and radical with a 2003 Cobra engine, the supercharger is providing plenty of boost to make the power with solid reliability.”

“Tuning is very critical on a modular motor,” Troy continued. “They are very quick to detonate and you need to make sure that the timing and fuel curves are on key. The way the fuel enters the chamber, it doesn’t have a lot of swirl. The fuel wants to throw fuel across the valve over to the far side of the exhaust.”

“What happens is you have a denser fuel charge by the exhaust, so it burns from the intake to the exhaust side, so they have a hot spot on the far side of the piston. Some shops will start with a centrifugal map in the ECU when tuning a roots style modular motor, and they end up killing the motor. Since the Whipple’s are positive displacement, they are already making boost at 2,000 rpm. You have to immediately pull the timing out of them…”

Eagerly Waiting the Installation

While we can’t complain that we got over 11,000 highly abused miles that included over 40 runs at the track with it, it was inevitable that the stock engine was going to slowly pass away. With a gaggle of low 10-second runs, we knew that was needed to build was reliable power, not really more power.

Ford Performance Solutions was very helpful when it came to building this fresh 4-valve that we hope will produce an additional 300 horsepower to the wheels over a stock 2003 Cobra. Troy and the team assembled the engine with all of our quality goodies, and soon we will be putting the 4.6-liter back into the Cobra for some tire roasting fun. We’ll bring you an update as soon as we stab the engine in!

Source:

Ford Performance Solutions
Web: www.f-p-s.com
Contact: (714) 305-8531

Comp Cams
Web: http://www.compcams.com
Contact: 1-800-999-0853

JE Pistons
Web: http://www.jepistons.com
Contact: 714-898-9764

Ferrea Valves
Web: http://www.ferrea.com

Canton
Web: http://www.cantonracingproducts.com/
Contact: 203.481.9460

Aeromotive
Web: http://www.aeromotiveinc.com
Contact: (913) 647-7300

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